Resurrection Sunday Musing: God’s love shown in power demands response

Today, April 8th, 2012 was Resurrection Sunday, more commonly known as Easter Sunday. It is a central day to the Christian faith for it is the day we recognize the power of God. On Friday the focus is death, pain, and loss and the act of one in obedience in love meeting the demands of justice. One act engaged in to impact all of creation, making things right. However, that one act would be meaningless without what happened two days later. A tomb was found empty, death was overcome, and Jesus was alive. He rose again. Death meant nothing. God showed His power as his plan played out. A way was made. See God, up to that point could not interact face to face with mankind, for doing so he faced the twisting and distortion of His creation. He saw that which is good corrupted. Can you imagine looking at what you created and seeing the flaws? Knowing that there was much better that could have been in store. He real would be unbearable. So God did not just accept the corruption. He did not just wipe us all out. Sure, with a simple word, God could make all right. He could undo the curse and make everything as it should with a word. He could end pain and suffering in but a moment. No, he had a plan, one that would demonstrate His love and power. God made a way, so that which was corrupted can approach God’s thrown and interact with Him day to day. He had wanted Israel to hear his voice and listen, and they declined that option. Now, we have God with us, the Holy Spirit in residence when we turn to God in surrender. God’s plan is one that teaches and demonstrates His love and goodness. It allows us to learn and grow. It forces us to move one direction or another. God’s power demands response and action. One cannot be silent about something so powerful. One can accept what happened and submit for look for other explanations. See, there were stories and alternatives presented at the very beginning. For what God made a way. God did and what happened with the empty tomb throws everything in chaos. It forces a choice. Some say that incredible claims demand incredible evidence. There has never been any more incredible evidence than the empty tomb and lives changed, Lives standing for what happened through pain, death, and torture. Lives were changed and uprooted. Yet, people still just cannot believe, for it demand a choice an giving up of self and what one hold dear. God showed His Love and Power. The world changed that day and while the curse is still playing out every day God has a plan to make all things right, in due time. So while we await that great and powerful day, we live each day growing, learning, and enduring life amidst the curse. Yet, we do so knowing God’s love is amazing and we only get but a glimpse, yet each glimpse contains the fullness of God’s love and power impacting each of us day by day.

Passion Week Musings: The Darkest Sabbath

Today in my mind and heart is best referred to as the dark Sabbath.  During this Passion Week, it is the day Jesus was in the grave.  He breathed Has last breath, declared it is finished, and was taken to the grave. Since he was in the grave on the Sabbath his body was not even properly addressed, that was too be finished on Sunday. The day of Jesus laying in the grave is a dark day with the emotions of those who followed and placed their faith in Jesus as Messiah in a dark, dark storm.

During the arrest and crucifixion the disciples responded their ways in similar vein, they just did it differently.  Some just ran. One ran so hard and so fast in fear that he left his clothing behind.  Some followed and watched it all, shocked. Some followed but defended self to the point of denial.   Fear, shock, and self-protecting denial occurred on the day of crucifixion.  Then Jesus died.

Imagine if you will your own storm of emotions that would occur as the one you left all to follow. The one you placed all hope and faith died the most horrendous death possible. He did not fight back. He did not defend himself to lies.  He just died.  Before he died he said confusing things like “My God, My God, why has though forsaken me.” and “It is finished.”  He even took time to assure His mother was cared for and attended to.  It would be absolutely devastating.  Then you take this man, this one you loved and put all trust, and see his dead, bloody, lifeless body placed in the grave. All your hopes, dreams, and faith seemed for naught, empty, and shattered.

We at some point each have tasted some measure of grief, but no grief ever experienced matches the grief of the disciples on that day.  They had to feel immense shock. They had thoughts such as:  How could this have happened?  Why didn’t he save or defend himself?  What does this mean? How could this happen if he is the Messiah?  Those questions and emotions would likely quickly turn to anger, even anger at the father.  Thoughts such as: God how could you let this happen? How could you give us the Messiah only to have him die?  How dare Jesus not defend himself, didn’t he know we all depended on him, gave up everything for him?  The emotions would quickly move toward despondency. There would be thoughts like: Now what? There is no place left to turn?  There is no hope for anyone? This doomed us all?  God cannot be real, so what is the point?  There also had to be lots of confusion and aimlessness. Thoughts would arise such as: What now?  What do I do tomorrow?  Where do I go from hear? Do I return to my old life?  I cannot go back, where do I go?    There are probably many more thoughts and emotions experienced on the darkest of Sabbaths.  For there is no other day in time where there seemed to be less reason for hope, more confusion about what lies ahead, more reason to question God.  The darkest Sabbath had it all.  For the disciples were shocked, grieved, and wounded. 

Now there are times even know in this life that what God is doing is hard to understand. We have expectations that are shattered. We have expectations of ways God will act, but what God does makes no sense.  We are often left wondering, grieved, confused, and questioning.  But know this; God’s plan is always for His glory. His plan is far better than our expectations, hopes and dreams.  We are not going to always understand or have answers.  Yet, we can always trust God to be faithful.  The darkest Sabbath was but a short moment in time.  Darkness grew and celebrated but that dark day did not last because God’s plan and power is soon to be revealed. The tomb is soon to be found empty.  God’s love and power is made manifest for all.  And the darkest levels of human emotions for those that spent every day following and walking in surrender to Jesus would turn to greatest Joy as the clarity and understanding of confusing words spoken occurs as the tomb will be empty.  If you are currently in a dark day or dark Sabbath, know full well, that when tomorrow does come, it comes with full hope and joy and the period of darkness was but a moment.  For while the day is dark, know that Sunday is coming!

Video Selection: Not by Might but by His Spirit-Three takes

Recently had conversation with someone and felt led to draw them to “Not by might, not by power, but by My spirit, says the Lord.”  The verse is found in Zechariah 4:6. Here is the full context of the passage.  May God lead the reader to discernment, open eyes, open ears, and open heart to what God is speaking in this verse. 

Zechariah 4:1-7 And the angel who talked with me came again and woke me, like a man who is awakened out of his sleep. And he said to me, “What do you see?” I said, “I see, and behold, a lampstand all of gold, with a bowl on the top of it, and seven lamps on it, with seven lips on each of the lamps that are on the top of it.  And there are two olive trees by it, one on the right of the bowl and the other on its left.  And I said to the angel who talked with me, “What are these, my lord? Then the angel who talked with me answered and said to me, “Do you not know what these are?” I said, “No, my lord.”Who are you, O great mountain? Before Zerubbabel you shall become a plain. And he shall bring forward the top stone amid shouts of ‘Grace, grace to it!'” Then he said to me, “This is the word of the LORD to Zerubbabel: Not by might, nor by power, but by my Spirit, says the LORD of hosts.

Also felt led to find the video of the Hymn based on the passage.  One video selection of that hymn is found below as well as other related music pieces, one by Robin Mark.  May God bless you as read listen and read and may it touch your heart at the depths and draw you to God’s strength beyond your own.

Poetry: Recessional by Rudyard Kipling’s

Recessional

Rudyard Kipling

God of our fathers, known of old– 
Lord of our far-flung battle line
Beneath whose awful hand we hold
   Dominion over palm and pine–
Lord God of Hosts, be with us yet,
Lest we forget – lest we forget!

The tumult and the shouting dies;
   The captains and the kings depart:
Still stands Thine ancient sacrifice,
   An humble and a contrite heart.
Lord God of Hosts, be with us yet,
Lest we forget – lest we forget!

Far-called, our navies melt away;
   On dune and headland sinks the fire:
Lo, all our pomp of yesterday
   Is one with Nineveh and Tyre!
Judge of the Nations, spare us yet,
Lest we forget – lest we forget!

If, drunk with sight of power, we loose
   Wild tongues that have not Thee in awe–
Such boasting as the Gentiles use
   Or lesser breeds without the law–
Lord God of Hosts, be with us yet,
Lest we forget – lest we forget!

For heathen heart that puts her trust
   In reeking tube and iron shard–
All valiant dust that builds on dust,
   And guarding, calls not Thee to guard–
For frantic boast and foolish word,
Thy mercy on Thy people, Lord!

Blog author’s note:  It is worth noting that Rudyard Kipling is a noted freemason. Yet, this particular poem fits truth and some things God is pointing me toward, so felt worth republishing this poem. Do not take the publication of this poem on the blog to point to his other poems and writing as being inspired by God. This poem is worth further study and contemplation.